Wargaming the Seven Years War with 40mm miniatures, done by: Johann-Peter Scheck and Anselm Scheck,
Bavaria.de and Maine.us
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Friday, April 18, 2014

Russian Dragoons Tverskii






























Here I present you my first regiment made of 42mm Irregular Miniatures, done by Ian Kay in UK.
In originla, they are called Austrian Dragoons, but they match very well with their purpose to be Russian Dragoons. Tver, a beautiful and old Russian city in the south of Petersburg, with an old, medieval Kreml fortress, provided 2 Regiments for the warfare in Prussia. So, they were seen at Kunersdorf and Zorndorf.
The officer, standard bearer and drummer are made by Matthias Manske - I think, this combination works well!































Saturday, April 5, 2014

Monthly meeting report of Nuremberger Zinnfigurenfreunde






















Our meeting at the VFZ in Nuremberg yesterday was, seen by the exposed displays, an announcement of spring, as seen on the image above: the "Maitanz" in flats (Heinrichsen figures) showing a Bavarian Volksfest scene.

But also the other collectors brought again some stunning works. First of all, my colleague Arthur Schneider, who is really my most adored painter (and meanwhile my teacher concerning painting figures and bases) showed us this 120mm Hussar:





























Have a look to the base, which is really a masterpiece - and so simple in technique.

Then we could welcome, finally, our member Mike, his marvelous blog is well.known: http://dreispitz.blogspot.de. He brought some 28mm Austrian Musketeers and Grenadiers from his own range:





























And, at least and the highlight of every meeting, Mr. Fechtner showing some flat figures out of his huge collection:



And, that was really touching for me, he made a gift to my daughter and gave her some wonderful flat figures with rabbits. As seen on this picture, my daughter was catching them too fast for the photographer, so she is only seen half on the foto - but I appreciated this gesture so highly:






Monday, March 24, 2014

Russia: Kazanski Regiment


 Just 3 months to our annual battle meeting with my nephew from US, the Russian army gets prepared for the summer warfare: we will play the "Black Powder" rules and a summer battle between Prussia and Russia. This Regimant of Kazan, the Capital of the Tatar Empire was oftenly seen during the SYW, especially in Zorndorf and Kunersdorf. They wear the red summer dress and white gaiters - some regimental specifics were not to be found in my sources - such as collar colors or other details. The figures are of the Matthias-Manske manufacture quite individually performed with heads, muskets and position.











Thursday, January 23, 2014

Cossacks marauding in Prussia

It is a cruel moment to see this scene on the picture, but I am also in love with this: there are so fantastic miniatures, done by Ian Kay, plenty of details and superb proportions (Irregular Miniatures - 42mm). The farmer girl is of El Viejo Dragon (1/43 Roman slave), but she matches well with the Russian lads on this round base. It is a kind of "the beauty and the beast" what  inspired me.
This was my first order at Irregular Miniatures and I am more than happy with this small art pieces.

So, shortly, I just combined them with my existing Cossacks of Matthias-Manske and made a short setting of a marauding unit in a burning village - as well known from contemporary descriptions of the battles of Kunersdorf and Zorndorf.
Manske-Cossacks advancing on the left...

























































This are the second two figures of Irregular miniatures: The Ataman of the Cossack horde and a private with the typical flag

a Manske-Cossack




It is a mistaken photo, but I like it :-)




2 Cossacks (Irregular miniatures)




Saturday, January 11, 2014

Les Baigneuses of the 18. century

























Today I present you a quite famous and oftenly found motive of the contemporary art of the 18. and 19. century: the motive of bathing women or nymphs. The idea is founded on the intention to built a normal pond, how we can find such in every Prussian and Silesian village of the 18. century
 - till today.

See this postcards I found by combing through Polish and German sites about East-Prussia:

Lake Schwentainen, Masuria, Poland;
source: Doliwa-Naturfoto.de

source: Doliwa-Naturfoto.de

pond in Mensguth Dorf, Ortelsburg district, former Prussia
source: www.Bildarchiv-Ostpreussen.de














































































But the object seemed to be too boring to be placed simply on the tabletop as a decorative element between the rural buildings around our battles. Having irregular troops like Cossacks and Prussian hussars and Jaegers, it could be a piquant detail to add some nude girls, having a bath in the pond.
If the Cossacks will harass them or the Prussians will defend them by time, we will see later.

This motive is also a theme in the classical art - nearly every painter used the motive of bathing nymphs in his work - it gives me also the excuse to be in a good society...  I risk to be spammed in google by showing naked bodies, but I hope, you will put your intellectual glasses on and interpretate my post as a contribution to an all-embracing knowledge of the life of the 18. century...
Thank you, gentlemen.

The figures are some of S+D 1/43 miniatures from UK, the ladies free of of clothes from the Spanish manufacturer El Viejo Dragon - a rare and excellent range of Roman Bath scenes. I gave them a pale skin and lighter, fair hair to match better in the Prussian-Polish context. That´s all. I forgot: It was also a nice occasion to experiment with the artificial water effect from NOCH, a sort of guck with a lot of options in modelling.




























































A nice couple of S+D Miniatures: girl pets a dachshund





























Paul Cézanne: les baigneuses

Pierre Auguste Renoir, Baigneuses


Pierre Auguste Renoir, Baigneuses 2
































Thanks to abdul666, who wrote me such a kind comment with this image linked, I put that here - it matches well with the theme. ..
source: http://p.joux.graphiste.free.fr/Histoire%20Web/18emeWeb/img18m/rgtBigorre.jpg